Record Retention Schedules

Records Retention Schedules

 


Legal Authority
Wyoming Statutes 9-2-410 states: “All public records are the property of the state. They shall be delivered by outgoing officials and employees to their successors and shall be preserved, stored, transferred, destroyed or disposed of, and otherwise managed, only in accordance with W.S. 9-2-405 through 9-2-413.”

Wyoming Statutes 9-2-401(a)(v) states that "Public record" includes the original and all copies of any paper, correspondence, form, book, photograph, photostat, film, microfilm, scan, sound recording, map, drawing or other document, regardless of physical, digital or electronic form or characteristics, which have been made or received in transacting public business by the state, a political subdivision or an agency of the state;


 



Have you just been appointed as your agency’s Records Officer?  Take a look at the Guidelines for State Agency Records Officers (below) to see what is required.  Please start by contacting your agency’s Records Analyst. He or she can give you an introduction to your duties and send you our Records Officer form to sign and return.


What are Record Retention Schedules?

Record Retention Schedules are lists of record types, organized by function and then by record title.  Each schedule lists the authorized retention period for that record type.  In the past, the State Archives created separate schedules for each record type for each separate agency office.  Our current retention schedules (below) apply regardless of which office produces the record.  See the example below of grant management records.  This type of record could be created by many different offices, but will be governed the same across state government.


How Do I Use the Record Retention Schedules?

Get an introduction

If you’re new to managing your office’s records, start by contacting your Records Analyst.  Our staff can help you understand the retention schedules which apply to your records.  They can also train you to use our RIMS online system to manage your records.

 

How long to keep your records

These retention schedules give your agency the legal authority to destroy records, if it chooses, after the records have been retained the established time period as approved by the State Records Committee. (W.S. 9-2-411) If you have reason to keep a record longer, you may continue to house the records on your own.  But keep in mind that records are expensive to maintain, and regardless of who stores them, they may be required as legal evidence.

 

Sample record retention schedule:recordRetention

 

    Event codes.  These are abbreviations noting the length of time which particular records must be retained.  An example is “CP 10” above.

Records with permanent/archival value.  

Elected or appointed officials and their staff are responsible for working with the State Archivist
to preserve all historical government records, and our archivists can assist you determining which records are deemed to be archival. Records scheduled as permanent may be kept in your custody or transferred to the State Archives. To arrange for onsite assistance or for any discussion about the records including transferring them, please call us at 777-7826.

 

Records involved in litigation.

Retain all records that may be used in pending or current litigation until its settlement. Policies and procedures should be put in place to prevent the destruction of records that would be used in litigation.

 


Where do I Find My Record Retention Schedules?

 


Crosswalks.  These provisional documents list all records schedules in current use by an agency.  They also list the superseded schedules formerly used for that group of records.  The superseded schedules are not valid; they are listed for reference only, for the convenience of agency staff who used them for many years.

 


What are Record Retention Schedules?

Record Retention Schedules are lists of record types, organized by function and then by record title.  Each schedule lists the authorized retention period for that record type.  In the past, the State Archives created separate schedules for each record type for each separate agency office.  Our current retention schedules (below) apply regardless of which office produces the record.  See the example below of grant management records.  This type of record could be created by many different offices, but will be governed the same across state government.


How Do I Use the Record Retention Schedules?

Get an introduction

If you’re new to managing your office’s records, start by contacting your Records Analyst.  Our staff can help you understand the retention schedules which apply to your records.  They can also train you to use our RIMS online system to manage your records.

 

How long to keep your records

These retention schedules give your agency the legal authority to destroy records, if it chooses, after the records have been retained the established time period as approved by the State Records Committee. (W.S. 9-2-411) If you have reason to keep a record longer, you may continue to house the records on your own.  But keep in mind that records are expensive to maintain, and regardless of who stores them, they may be required as legal evidence.

 

Sample record retention schedule:recordRetention

 

    Event codes.  These are abbreviations noting the length of time which particular records must be retained.  An example is “CP 10” above.

Records with permanent/archival value.  

Elected or appointed officials and their staff are responsible for working with the State Archivist
to preserve all historical government records, and our archivists can assist you determining which records are deemed to be archival. Records scheduled as permanent may be kept in your custody or transferred to the State Archives. To arrange for onsite assistance or for any discussion about the records including transferring them, please call us at 777-7826.

 

Records involved in litigation.

Retain all records that may be used in pending or current litigation until its settlement. Policies and procedures should be put in place to prevent the destruction of records that would be used in litigation.

 


Where do I Find My Record Retention Schedules?

 


Crosswalks.  These provisional documents list all records schedules in current use by an agency.  They also list the superseded schedules formerly used for that group of records.  The superseded schedules are not valid; they are listed for reference only, for the convenience of agency staff who used them for many years.

 


Can I destroy paper copies of records which have been digitized?  

Non-permanent records should be properly destroyed according to approved methods: You must meet the requirements set forth in the Uniform Electronic Transactions Act (in particular W.S. 40-21-112 below)  and the State of Wyoming Enterprise Technology Services' Rule 5 (below), if you plan to discard paper copies of non-permanent records. As always, we recommend that you check with your attorney if you have any concerns about this.

What about destroying permanent records?

Only the State Records Committee can approve destruction of paper copies of permanent records. Contact your analyst to discuss how to initiate this request.

Can I destroy records on my own?  

You may destroy Non-permanent records according to approved methods (see “Can I destroy…?” above).  Only the State Records Committee can approve destruction of paper copies of permanent records. Contact your analyst to discuss this.

How will I know when my records’ retention periods have been met?  

If you have transferred your records to the State Records Center, we will notify you when your records have met their retention period.  At that time, we will send you a Disposition Approval Report.  Your designated agency Records Officer will have the opportunity to review this request and authorize our Records Management staff to destroy those records.


If you have questions concerning the above retention schedules, about record retention schedules not yet listed on this page, or to obtain a digital copy of the retention schedules affecting your office please contact your analyst, or:

 

Kathy Marquis
Deputy State Archivist
Wyoming State Archives
Barrett Building
2301 Central Avenue
Cheyenne, WY 82002

(307) 777-7826
FAX: (307) 777-7044

Email Kathy